Twin Brothers Talk About Why They Bailed On The Recent WWE Tryouts, Being Invited By WWE, More

– We noted back in June that indie wrestlers Dustin and Derek Mehl, twin brothers who are known as The Stoner Brothers and Suburban Commandos, worked day 1 of a recent set of WWE tryouts at the Performance Center but did not return for day 2, which was the hardest day of the week – cardio day. It was reported that they had heat from other wrestlers because there were many other indie talents who would have given up anything to be at the tryouts. It was noted that wrestlers resented the two because they felt those tryout spots could have went to wrestlers who deserved them. The brothers recently appeared on the podcast and the following highlights were sent in:

Being invited to the recent WWE tryout:

Dustin: “Out of nowhere WWE called us up and in our heads we kind of marked out. We figured they would fly us out and we’d get a free vacation out of it and show them what we can do…We never sent them anything other than an extra thing on maybe ten years ago, but when they called us they said that they had an e-mail that I haven’t had in a really long time, so they found us on Facebook.”

Whether or not cardio affected their decision to leave early:

Dustin: “Regal had to point me to a trash can a couple of times to get some liquid out of my system, but we didn’t quit and didn’t stop. We got up the next morning and Derek and I had a heart-to-heart and realized we were acting like marks. Our heart is in Oakland with Hoodslam, our students and our school. We’ve been building this for five years and not so we can go to WWE.”

Whether or not they took someone else’s spot in the camp:

Dustin: “We didn’t take anyone else’s spot in the camp.”

Derek: “We didn’t take anyone’s f*cking spot because they were our spots. They came to us. We didn’t come to them.”

The phenomenon that is Hoodslam:

Dustin: “It’s not even about drawing the thousand plus people, it’s all about the vibe. It’s about the boys and having fun. No one’s stressing on anything or dealing with assholes. It’s like a big party with dancing and a live band. It’s not traditional wrestling. There’s athleticism and wrestling, but it’s more pop culture.”